Movie Night

There are so many great books making their way onto the big screen lately its hard to keep up! While a night out at the movie theater can be a lot of fun it can get expensive to go often. A family movie night at home with a DVD checked out from the library (and maybe some pizza and popcorn for good measure) can be an affordable way to spend some quality time together and catch up on the latest features.

Every Friday we are going to give you a few family friendly movie suggestions from our DVD library here at Wellman-Scofield. While they might not all be movies stemmed from best selling books, we will try to always include a few (we are a library after all). Then all thats left is to come visit us at the library and check out a (free!) movie for your own family movie night! Enjoy!

Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs

meatballs

“Parents need to know that this adaptation of the classic children’s book Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs is bound to attract the 10-and-under set. While there’s nothing overtly age-inappropriate in the movie, expect a bit of salty language along the lines of “hell” and and the occasional mild insult like “stupid” or “knuckle scrapers.” The few tense/slightly scary scenes are weather- and giant food-related — which could upset little kids who are sensitive to fears about natural disasters — and there’s a brewing romance between the main character and a weather reporter. Although no grand life lessons are offered, the movie does center on a son’s need for fatherly encouragement and the idea that you shouldn’t compromise who you are just to be popular. The movie’s plot is very different than the book’s, so those expecting a straight adaptation may be disappointed.” -Common Sense Media

Kubo and the Two Strings

Kubo_and_the_Two_Strings_poster

“Parents need to know that Kubo and the Two Strings is an adventure from LAIKA Animationthe studio behind CoralineParaNormanThe Boxtrolls, and Corpse Bride. Like those films, it has more darkness and edge than many average kids’ movies and is best suited for tweens and older, rather than the preschool and early-elementary set. It has scary characters and epic battles that can be quite intense and that lead to character injuries, an entire village burning (though the villagers survive), and even deaths. Language is limited to a few insults (“stupid,” “idiot,” etc.) and romance to a couple of embraces and references to a past love story. Despite the peril, this epic adventure set in an alternative fantasy Japan has strong themes of courage and teamwork. And at heart, it’s a mother-and-son love story, as well as the tale of a young artist learning how to be a hero.”  -Common Sense Media

Hidden Figures

The_official_poster_for_the_film_Hidden_Figures,_2016

“Parents need to know that Hidden Figures is based on the inspiring true story of three brilliant African-American women who worked at NASA in the 1950s and ’60s as “human computers” — making calculations and contributions that helped launch the manned spaceflight program. Dorothy Vaughn (Octavia Spencer), Mary Jackson (Janelle Monáe), and Katherine Johnson (Taraji P. Henson) were engineers and computers at NASA at a time when both women and African Americans were still widely discriminated against, particularly in segregationist Virginia. where NASA’s Langley Research Center is based. There’s a little bit of romance (a few kisses, flirty comments, and slow dancing) and a bit of salty language (mostly along the lines of “damn” and “Jesus Christ” as an exclamation). The film also offers a realistic look at the racial tensions of the Civil Rights era (segregated bathrooms, libraries, schools, facilities), and audiences will learn a lot about these pioneering women and what they had to overcome to make their mark at NASA. They’re excellent role models, and their story is full of positive messages and themes, including integrity, perseverance, teamwork, and communication.” -Common Sense Media

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s